Appreciating JSP

by

mFrolic.1Sheet

edited from Mike Yates (www.mustrad.org.uk):

JSP records were formed in 1978 by London-based blues promoter John Stedman.  (JSP actually stands for John Stedman Promotions.)  Over the past few years they have been slowly issuing classic box sets of early 78rpm recordings, not only of blues singers, but also of old-timey and country music, jazz, music-hall, and an assortment of so-called ‘ethnic’ recordings; the latter including Jewish Klezmorin, Greek Rembetika, Cajun and both Bulgarian and Slovenian singers and musicians.

The two volume set of Uncle Dave Macon recordings are, to my mind, amazing (JSP7729 & JSP7769), especially when you consider that a similar German re-issue set can cost you in excess of £200.  Likewise the outstanding Charlie Poole set (JSP7734), which is again far cheaper than the offerings of some other re-issue companies.  Some anthologies, such as Serenade in the Mountains –Early Old-Time Music on Record (JSP7780), contain really outstanding performances, although in one or two cases, Classic Field Recordings (JSP77131) springs to mind, some of the performers are not quite in the same league.

One other performer, Riley Puckett, whose sometimes eccentric guitar runs and vocals were a feature of the Skillet Licker’s recordings, surprised me when I heard his 4 CD set – Riley Puckett: Country Music Pioneer (JSP77138).  Here was a performer, I thought, who would not have enough good material to fill 4 CDs.  Well, I was wrong and I have to say that Puckett’s singing, even on songs such as Little Brown Jug, Red Sails in the Sunset, Moonlight on the Colorado, When I Grow too Old to Dream and South of the Border seems to get better each time I play these albums.

Three of my favourite old-timey sets are Worried Blues (JSP7743), which contains all the recordings made by Frank Hutchinson and Kelly Harrell (as well as recordings by the Tenneva Ramblers and the Blue Ridge Highballers), Serenade in the Mountains (JSP7780), with recordings by the likes of Bascom Lamar Lunsford, the Nation Brothers, the Carolina Tarheels and the Floyd County Ramblers, and Mountain Frolic (JSP77100), another anthology with superb recordings by Buell Kazee, Al Hopkins, the Crockett Family and many, many more.

I should also mention Appalachian Stomp Down (JSP7761) which contains the recorded works of two of my favourite performers, G.  B.  Grayson & Henry Whitter.  Grayson, a lovely old-time fiddler, was descended from the sheriff of that name who arrested the legendary Tom Dooley.

There are solo sets by the Delmore Brothers (JSP7727, JSP7765 & JSP7784), Cliff Carlisle (JSP7732 & JSP7768), Darby & Tarlton (JSP7746), and J.E.Mainer (JSP77118 & JSP77124).  If you are looking for early bluegrass recordings then I would suggest Bill Monroe & His Bluegrass Boys: All the Classic Releases 1937 – 49 (JSP7712), the anthology Bluegrass – Classic Recordings Remastered.  Early Cuts from 1931 – 53 (JSP7731), another anthology Authentic Rare Bluegrass – Independent Label Sides 1951 – 54 (JSP77110), which contains some wonderful tracks, and Flatt & Scruggs and the Stanley Brothers (JSP7724).  I really do like the Stanley Brothers’ early recordings, especially their version of the old English folk song Oxford City (here titled The Little Glass of Wine).

 

Advertisements

One Response to “Appreciating JSP”

  1. pfeldmann Says:

    Now, it’s wonderful to get fine recording reissues for little money. I have heard stories, however, that JSP simply pirated the work done by Richard Weise, who has produced consistently-excellent reissue sets in Germany. I don’t know if this is true, and I certainly hope it is not. I would advise readers to check out the issues of Bear Family, which in my mind stands the the premier champion of classic country reissues.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s