Posts Tagged ‘Fremeaux’

Fremeaux: An Alternate “Anthology”

July 12, 2012

Thanks to Google Translate for this wonderful  poetic jumble: a French review (originally)  of “Folksongs — Old Time Country Music 1926-1944”  by the French label  Fremeaux, translated into English by a computer.  

This collection is an alternate Anthology of American Folk Music, with only 6 cuts that duplicate Harry Smith’s.    FREMEAUX  (CD FA047)

by Bruno Juffin

This handful of tunes and bloody desolate reflects the image of a hyperreal America.
Long before entering a nursing home, folksongs had restless legs, a spider on the ceiling and fire in the pants. People of ruffians, thugs and thieves, legendary, elusive, the first folk heroes are on the run, jumping from country and blues pseudonym nickname with consummate art of obfuscation of.

Thus Stackalee (or Stagolee, or Staggerlee), which for a dark tale of a hat stolen from William Lyons one evening in December 1895 in Saint Louis, Missouri.  But long before dissertations in ethnomusicology are devoted to him (as well as impressive articles Greil Marcus, who since his legendary Mystery train tracks down the ramifications of the song with a zeal bordering on obsession), was recorded by  Frank Hutchinson, a White pomaded who sang as the brother of Robert Johnson, in an impeccable version of providentially exhumed on the new anthology Frémeaux & Associates.

Fascinating mess. An Irish lament gives birth to the blues, beautifully sung by Jimmie Rodgers, the patriarch of country music (Gambling barroom blues); discovered the Carter Family Rambling Boy, where one guesses at the draft stage of the melody famous Lost highway, later immortalized by Hank Williams, the first song, The Coo Coo bird, eclipse interpretations that have data Janis Joplin and Kristin Hersh. On the (beautiful) pictures of the booklet, raise families in their Sunday best with a stiff hiétatique, a trapper’s hut lost in the depths of the Appalachian Scots exudes tranquility.

Idyllic images, but the lyrics of these songs lousy (recording conditions radically rustic) and wonderful (the heavenly voices of the Carter Family) detail of broken lives by hard wearing (Nine pound hammer) and amorous passions ending in blood (Frankie and Johnnie). This Old time country music is the voice of a nation barely out of adolescence and already esquintée; the torments she expresses are the best antidote to nostalgia for a golden age of fictional qu’entretient TODAY.

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Fremeaux’s Banjo Anthology

January 15, 2012

Fremeaux and Associates, from France, has an outstanding catalogue of music from the southern U.S.  It’s refreshing to see southern old time music presented from the European perspective as one of the planet’s many fascinating ethnic music genres.  See also their “FOLKSONGS:  OLD TIME COUNTRY MUSIC 1926 – 1944

Check out the recordings their musicologists have selected for the banjo anthology below.

The view from France:

For over a century, the Banjo has always been a vital part of the musical history of North America. Its early history is represented in this 40 tracks boxset by banjo specialist Gérard de Smaele. These titles reflect the adventure of the United States of America in an outstanding anthropological topic, detailed in a 36 pages booklet with both French and English notes. From its African and European origins until the roots of the “Folk Revival”, a decisive entry into American culture and identity.
–Patrick Frémeaux

“Banjo: An American Five String History 1901-1956,” Fremeaux FA5179   Available here.

CD 1 : 1. PIDOUX JOHN : DARKEY’S DREAM (THOMAS J. ARMSTRONG) 2’38 • 2. FARLAND ALFRED A. : CARNIVAL IN VENICE (ZANI DE FARRANTI) 4’00 • 3. BACON FRED : OLD BLACK JOE (STEPHEN FOSTER) 3’16 • 4. VAN EPS FRED : COCOANUT DANCE (HERMAN, TOBANI) 3’04 • 5. OSSMAN SYLVESTER L “VESS” : RUSTY RAGS MEDLEY (UNKNOWN) 2’23 • 6. CAMMEYER ALFRED DAVIES & SHEAFF BERNARD : DANSE BIZARRE (CAMMEYER) 2’48 • 7. OAKLEY OLLY : ROMPING ROSSIE (MADELINE ROSSITER) 2’54 • 8. RESER HARRY : HEEBE JEEBES (HARRY RESER) 3’10 • 9. BURNETT RICHARD “DICK” : LADIES ON THE STREAMBOAT (UNKNOWN) 3’11 • 10. JENKINS FRANK : BABTIST SHOUT “SPANISH FANDANGO” (TRAD.) 2’47 • 11. MACON DAVID HARRISON “UNCLE DAVE” : TENNESSEE RED FOX CHASE (UNKNOWN) 3’17 • 12. MACON DAVID HARRISON “UNCLE DAVE” : RUN (UNKNOWN) 3’03 • 13. MCGEE BROTHERS (SAM, KIRK) : MILK COW BLUES (KOKOMO ARNOLD) 2’23 • 14. ASHLEY CLARENCE “TOM” : NAOMI WISE (TRAD.) 2’57 • 15. BEGLEY JUSTIS : THE GOLDEN WILLOW TREE (TRAD.) 4’17 • 16. BOGGS DOCK (MORLAN L.) : DANVILLE GIRL (TRAD.) 3’08 • 17. BOGGS DOCK (MORLAN L.) : OLD RUB ALCOHOL BLUES (TRAD.) 3’19 • 18. WILLIAMS WALTER : MUD FENCE (TRAD.) 1’50 • 19. SMITH HOBART : THE CUCKOO BIRD (TRAD.) 2’38 • 20. WILLINGHAM THADDEUS C. : ROLL ON THE GROUND (TRAD.) 3’14.
CD2 : 1. CRISP RUFUS : BALL AND CHAIN (TRAD.) 3’07 • 2. FRAZIER NATHAN : PO BLACK SHEEP (TRAD.) 3’12 • 3. LOWE CHARLIE : TATER PATCH (UNKNOWN) 1’54 • 4. SLAYDEN WILL : JOHN HENRY (TRAD.) 2’31 • 5. SMITH LUCIOUS : NEW RAILROAD (UNKNOWN) 3’14 • 6. STEELE PETE : COAL CREEK MARCH (PETER STEELE) 1’32 • 7. LUNSFORD BASCOM LAMAR : SWANNANOA TUNNEL (TRAD.) 3’42 • 8. KAZEE BUELL : OLD WHISKER, THE MOONSHINER (TRAD.) 3’18 • 9. WALSH DOCK : COME BATH IN THAT BEAUTIFULL POOL (UNKNOWN) 3’04 • 10. POOLE CHARLES CLEVELAND “CHARLIE” : DON’T LET YOUR DEAL GO DOWN (TRAD.) 2’54 • 11. POOLE CHARLES CLEVELAND “CHARLIE” (PIANO : LUCY TERRY) : DON’T LET YOUR DEAL GO DOWN MEDLEY (TRAD.) 3’19 • 12. CLARK BOB “BOSSIE” : ITALIAN MULAZICCI (UNKNOWN) 1’50 • 13. MONROE WILLIAM SMITH “ BILL” (BANJO : EARL SCRUGGS) : BLUEGRASS BREAKDOWN (BILL MONROE) 2’16 • 14. LYLE RUDY (THE BLUEGRASS BOYS) : WHITE HOUSE BLUES (WILBUR JONES) 2’17 • 15. STANLEY RALPH (THE STANLEY BROTHERS) : PRETTY POLLY (TRAD.) 2’53 • 16. SCRUGGS EARL (FLATT & SCRUGGS) : FLINT HILL SPECIAL (EARL SCRUGGS) 2’50 • 17. SEEGER PETER “PETE” : BABE O’MINE (SARAH OGAN GUNNING) 2’44 • 18. SEEGER PETER “PETE” : BLUE SKIES (IRVIN BERLIN) 2’23 • 19. SEEGER PETER “PETE” : LISTEN MR BILBO (BOB ET ADRIENNE CLAIBORNE) 2’0420. WARD WADE : OLD JOE CLARK (TRAD.) 0’53